Sara Santos-Tran wrangles both a new baby and a preschooler daily at her Toronto home, but she recently caught the buzzy rom-com To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before and might squeeze in Switched at Birth on her iPad during naptime or relax with Suits after the kids are in bed.

Meanwhile, David Lewis just finished Luke Cage and The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. The Ottawa-based communications advisor is anticipating Jack Ryan next, along with searching out new releases to watch on his laptop, smart phone or TV via XBox.

Both are interested in what’s new from Hollywood, but like a growing wave of Canadians, they want to see it — and stream it — on their own terms wherever they want.

This is the reality facing the Toronto International Film Festival, which is rolling out the red carpet for streaming services.

At the 2018 festival, which kicked off Thursday, TIFF is showcasing eight Netflix movies, led by director David Mackenzie’s Outlaw King, the historical action drama starring Chris Pine. The film nabbed the festival’s high-profile opening night slot and is slated for release on Netflix in November.

“We want a film that’s got a great story, that our audiences are going to respond to, by a filmmaker with real renown. This film fits the bill,” said TIFF artistic director Cameron Bailey.

“We like it when people come together to watch movies — there’s something special about that,” he said. “Films are being made and produced and delivered in many different ways now.”

Amazon is also in the TIFF mix this year with Homecoming, a new drama series starring Julia Roberts.